Plumbing Tips to Reduce Water and Energy Consumption

Plumbing Tips to Reduce Water and Energy Consumption

Plumbing Tips to Reduce Water and Energy Consumption

Introduction

Nowadays, there is an overwhelming consensus for keeping the earth safe for the continued life of creatures and the next generations’ wellbeing. A large contribution to saving the earth is water efficiency. As we all know, several countries have lately suffered from drought and finding water resources could become a crucial issue in the near future. That is why it is needed to find solutions aimed at saving up water as much as possible. Saving water does not only saves anyone some numbers on water bills, but it also contributes to less use of energy for water treatment and its distribution, and it means less CO2 emission. So how can we save the earth? Having an efficient plumbing system in buildings and houses is a great way to start. Here are some tips about plumbing that reduces water and energy consumption:

  • Low-Flow Toilets

It might seem unimportant but “Old toilets” are one of the biggest reasons for high bills. As an upgrade to earlier toilets, Low-Flow toilet bowls have made it possible to use less water and create a powerful toilet flush. They use about 1.3 gallons per flush as compared to old toilets that use about 5+ gallons per flush which is around 3 gallons more per flush than Low-Flow ones! 

Old toilets - efficient toilets difference

Old toilets / efficient toilets difference

  • Water Sense Products

Like Low-Flow Faucets and showerheads that use aerators to maintain the pressure while reducing water output, water sense products are also certified from the third party for better efficiency because nearly 17% of the water used in homes is for showering only. Upgrading should be considered as a solution because it can reduce a household’s water use by more than 500 gallons per year. This is the average water used to do 14 loads of laundry. Aerators can be purchased and added to faucets like accessories, and there is no need to change the whole faucet.

Low-Flow showerhead

Low-Flow showerhead

  • Periodical Home Inspection

As mentioned earlier, hidden leakages can also occur by time. Therefore, annual inspections of home plumbing are necessary as they have several benefits. For example, since 15% of annual water consumption is through Faucets, eliminating water leaks and fixing broken faucets or showerhead that drain water or even fixing a small leak could save a lot of money, water, and energy because a dripping faucet can waste more than 20 gallons per day. Prediction and prevention of upcoming issues are always recommended. During the inspection, the plumber can notice signs of wear and tear in the pipes that can be fixed in a controlled circumstance which is definitely better than a big mess in the yard.

Plumbing Home Inspection

Plumbing Home Inspection

  • Tank-less water heaters

Tank-less water heaters only heat the water used which can lower significantly energy usage.          Known also as on-demand water heater, they can eliminate the lost energy in standby periods when hot water cools down in long pipe runs or while it’s sitting in the storage tank. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates gas-fired tank-less heaters save an average of $108 in energy costs per year over their traditional tank counterparts. Meanwhile, if upgrading is still out of reach, then cleaning out the tank can really help the performance and efficiency of the water heater and can also increase its durability by flushing out corrosion.

Electric on Demand Water Heater

Electric on Demand Water Heater

  • Thermal insulation

By adding a layer of insulation to pipes, heat loss can be reduced from the hot water heater to the plumbing fixture. It can also prevent condensation on the pipe surface which leads to corrosion or rust, which is a very damaging problem.

Insulated pipes

Insulated pipes

  • Sustainable Water Reuse Systems

Water sustainability can be improved by implementing water collection and reuse strategies. Rainwater collection is one of the most popular strategies. Also known as “rainwater harvesting” or “stormwater collection”, these systems direct the water from gutters into a tank rather than into sinks and sewers. However, since this water is for non-potable applications, it can, therefore, be reused and distributed through the house for laundry, toilet tanks, gardens, and any outside use.

That can be up to 50% in the average family home.

Water reuse system

Water reuse system

Conclusion

In conclusion, all of these easy and simple tips can save a decent amount of money and most importantly can save a lot of water and energy to make humanity live an efficient life in a healthy environment.

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